New York School Poets

Continuing the discussion from Personal Introductions (forum-wide):

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I love the New York School. I live in the East Village where many of them got their start. I like Ashberry but really love John Koethe and Frank O’Hara, who were close to him. I suspect that many of us are trying to get an alternative school happening here. Something rigorous without the graduate school hangover. A real collaborative effort. The New York School epitomized that kind of aesthetic.

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Now that was a post after my own heart! So glad to find another fan of the New York School. I am also a big fan of Koethe and O’hara. I actually just took Koethe’s new book (a Selected, with I think some new material) from the library, and have been reading it now and then. (I love his poetry, but find him occasionally to be dispiriting or depressing, as if he is so in love with the past, or nostalgia, that he doesn’t really experience the present.) I once wrote him when I was a graduate student a long time ago - I was so excited when I encountered his voice, it seemed like this really amazing combination of Ashbery, Wallace Stevens, and something Koethe’s own. He wrote a really nice email back. I know that there are younger poets, like Adam Fitzgerald and Dorothea Lasky, who are maybe considered a 3rd generation of New York School? I guess I’m just a sucker for the freedom I find in, yes, Ashbery, but also someone like Ron Padgett, his early stuff.

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I am not familiar with them. Thanks, Andrew, for sparking my interest. I do think there is a new wave coming at us!

My pleasure, john. One thing I thought of - there is a poet and scholar named Nick Sturm on Twitter, and he posts a lot about “2nd generation New York School” people, especially a poet named Alice Notley. He recently posted a link to this really wonderful (and free!?) book:

Encyclopedia of the New York School of Poets.pdf (4.6 MB)

(an entire encyclopedia of the New York School! :heart_eyes:) lol

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(not sure if the link worked, but let me know if you’re interested and I could try emailing or direct messaging or some such thing.)

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It works. Thanks, Andrew.

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I am visiting NYC in a few weeks. I will have to find these 3rd (or 4th?) generation poets!

Nice to meet you, @AndrewField81, welcome, and thanks for sharing.

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Exciting about visiting NYC!

Nice to meet you, Marco, and thank you for the work you are doing for this great website.

Also, thanks for fixing the link to the encyclopedia!

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I posted this essay today on Medium - thought it might be relevant to our discussion here on the New York School, as well as to Integral Poetry, Quantum Poetics, and anything else about poetics, poetry and spirituality. It’s about John Ashbery’s poetry, more specifically about what the Argentine writer Borges called “the imminence of the revelation not yet produced,” which Ashbery once wrote about, and which is in abundant display in his work. I tried to capture my own felt sense of reading Ashbery over the course of more than a decade, how it performs and embodies - and therefore gives to us as an experience - this teetering on the edge of something transcendent, i.e. a form of waiting, without actually giving us the revelation (perhaps too much to ask of most anything?).

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